Updated : March 14, 2012

Photos taken while at work

Apart from being a ham operator as a hobby, I was, until my retirement in 2007, also professionally involved in radio communication as a radio system design engineer and as such responsible for the design of radio networks ranging from systems operating in the medium frequency bands up to the higher microwave frequencies. For many years most of my activities concentrated on systems operating in Latin America and Africa. However since the liberalization of the telecom market in my home country my professional activities were mainly limited to the design of microwave transmission networks in The Netherlands. But irrespective where I was at work, I usually took my camera with me as you will discover here.

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My first job after liberalization of the telecom market in The Netherlands was the design of a 2xSTM-1 microwave network for one of the new telecom operators and linking the major cities in the western part of The Netherlands. Shown here are 7.5, 13 and 38 GHz parabolic antennae installed on the telecom tower in Rotterdam as part of that network. Visible in the background is the port of Rotterdam.

Photo 1.

Rotterdam, The Netherlands

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My career as a telecommunication engineer however started in May 1969 as an employee of Radio Holland. One of my first design jobs in the early 70's was a telemetry and telecommunication system for an ELSBM (Exposed Location Single-Buoy Mooring), a floating chamber anchored near a production platform in order to serve as a flexible connection to a tanker taking on oil from the platform. Here the ELBSM during trials in a fjord near Stavanger before being towed to the North Sea Auk Field.

Photo 2.

Stavanger, Norway

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During 1979 and 1980 I was responsible for the design of telecommunication systems for the new industrial port of Yanbu in Saudi Arabia including a VHF Port Radio Station, a VHF/MF/HF Coastal Radio Station, UHF Port Management Communication Systems and a Non-directional LF Radio Beacon. This photo shows me while visiting Yanbu in June 1980 for a design review meeting.

Photo 3.

Yanbu, Saudi Arabia

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In 1985 my company was awarded a contract to design and supply MF/HF/VHF/UHF telecommunication facilities for 5 ports in Honduras as well as a VHF link between the main port of Puerto Cortes and the capital Tegucigalpa. Site surveys were carried out early 1985. This photo shows me (sitting on the right) flying over Honduras in February 1985 searching for suitable mountain top repeater locations for the Puerto Cortes to Tegucigalpa link.

Photo 4.

Honduras

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One of our targets during the aerial survey was Cerro Negro de Omoa, a mountain with an elevation of 985 meters 16.4 kilometers southwest of Puerto Cortes near the Atlantic north coast of Honduras. This location was selected for one of the two repeaters required to establish a reliable link between Puerto Cortes and Tegucigalpa.

View a map showing the routing of this link.

Photo 5.

Honduras

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When actually visiting the selected locations for a site survey we were now and then facing some problems. Like here when we got bogged down in the mud while we were on our way to the top of Mount La Tigra (2130 meters) near Tegucigalpa.

Photo 6.

Honduras

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Flying over the south of Honduras while approaching a small sandy airstrip near San Lorenzo for a visit to the port of San Lorenzo (February 1985).

Photo 7.

Honduras

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On final approach to the airstrip near San Lorenzo (February 1985).

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Honduras

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And after a safe landing waiting for the car to bring us to the port of San Lorenzo (February 1985).

Photo 9.

Honduras

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Pushing the plane (Cessna R172 Hawk XPII, HR-ACC) into position for the return flight to San Pedro Sula (february 1985).

Photo 10.

Honduras

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Being responsible for the HF ground-to-air communication I was involved in the first attempt by captain Henk Brink and crew members Evelien Brink and Evert Louwman to cross the Atlantic Ocean with a Roziere balloon (a hybrid balloon using a combination of helium and hot air), registered as PH-LMD, in August 1985. This picture shows me sitting on the left in the operations center with the 400 and 1000 watts HF Transmitters in the background.

Photo 11.

Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (AMS), The Netherlands

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We returned to Honduras in November 1985 to install the MF/HF/VHF/UHF telecommunication facilities in Tegucigalpa and the ports of Puerto Cortes, Tela, La Ceiba, Puerto Castilla and San Lorenzo. This photo was taken during the installation of the medium- and shortwave antenna system on the beach in La Ceiba.

View a map with the project locations.

Photo 12.

La Ceiba, Honduras

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Preparing to transport radio equipment and antenna materials from our base in Puerto Cortes by road to La Ceiba and from there by plane to Puerto Castilla for the installation of an MF/HF/VHF Port Radio Station in Puerto Castilla (November 1985).

Photo 13.

Puerto Cortes, Honduras

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Departing from La Ceiba to Puerto Castilla for the installation of a medium- and shortwave maritime Port Radio Station. It still seems incredible that we managed to get all our equipment and ourselves onboard this Cessna 206 aircraft (November 1985).

Photo 14.

La Ceiba, Honduras

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Unloading antenna materials after arriving in Puerto Castilla (November 1985).

Photo 15.

Puerto Castilla, Honduras

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The MF/HF Antenna system as installed in Puerto Castilla the place where Columbus first set foot on the North American mainland on August the 14th, 1502 during his fourth and last trip to the Americas. Later Spanish explorers called this area Cabo de Honduras (Cape of Deep Waters) for the relatively deep water off the coast. Just visible in the background is Bahia de Trujillo. Not visible but certainly present were many mosquitos apparently with a preference for radio engineers installing an antenna system (November 1985).

Photo 16.

Puerto Castilla, Honduras

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Job finished and preparing for the return flight to San Pedro Sula, again puzzling how to get all our equipment and ourselves onboard this Cessna aircraft (November 1985).

Photo 17.

Puerto Castilla, Honduras

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A burst of heavy tropical rainshowers over Bahia de Trujillo while taking off from the Puerto Castilla airstrip for the return flight to San Pedro Sula after a working day in Puerto Castilla (November 1985).

Photo 18.

Puerto Castilla, Honduras

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Overlooking the port of Puerto Castilla during a right-hand climbing turn over Bahia de Trujillo heading for San Pedro Sula (November 1985).

Photo 19.

Puerto Castilla, Honduras

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Supporting mast for an HF antenna on the beach of La Ceiba (November 1985).

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La Ceiba, Honduras

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MF/HF/VHF Port Radio Station installed in Puerto Cortes for the national port authorities of Honduras (Empresa Nacional Portuaria).

Photo 21.

Puerto Cortes, Honduras

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View more photos taken in Honduras.

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En route in Belize from Belize City to a remote radio relay station on Sibun Hill for a site survey (May 1987).

Photo 22.

Belize

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The remote radio relay station located on Sibun Hill, 995 meters above mean sea level, in Belize (May 1987).

Photo 23.

Belize

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A closer look at the Sibun Hill radio site.

Photo 24.

Belize

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A quite explicit notice inside the Sibun Hill radio relay station miles away from nowhere.

Photo 25.

Belize

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View more photos taken in Belize.

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Radio relay station on the crater edgde of volcano El Boqueron (1840 meters a.m.s.l.) near San Salvador in May 1987.

Photo 26.

Volcano El Boqueron, El Salvador

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View more photos taken in El Salvador.

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Radio relay station, 1910 meters above mean sea level, on top of a mountain near Santa Elena Barillas in Guatemala (May 1987).

Photo 27.

Santa Elena Barillas, Guatemala

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In 1989 I conducted a site survey in Ghana as part of the design of the telecommunication infrastructure for a gold mine in Bogoso, Ghana. This project included VHF and UHF radio systems, a PABX with 100 extensions as well as a 2 MB/s microwave link to connect these facilities with the network of the Ghanaian P&T. For that purpose a 2 meter microwave dish had to be installed on this 102 meter P&T microwave tower in Tarkwa constructed in 1981.

Photo 28.

Tarkwa, Ghana

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Installation of the feeders on the P&T microwave tower in Tarkwa.

Photo 29.

Tarkwa, Ghana

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View more photos taken in Ghana.

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After the liberalization in 1997 of the telecom market in The Netherlands my activities mainly concentrated on the design and implementation of microwave networks in The Netherlands until then a monopoly of the Dutch PT&T. No longer high mountains and volcanoes in far away places, but telecom towers and high buildings.

My first "home" job was this 2x155 Mbit/s SDH network linking the major cities in the western part of the Netherlands, Amsterdam, The Hague, Rotterdam and Utrecht, with intermediate repeaters in Gouda and my home town Alphen aan den Rijn.

Photo 30.

The Netherlands

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A 1.2 meter 13 GHz antenna on a 40 meter rooftop of an office building in Gouda.

Photo 31.

Gouda, The Netherlands

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48 VDC distribution panel and dehydration equipment as part of a 7.5 GHz 2 x STM-1 microwave terminal on the telecommunication tower in The Hague.

Photo 32.

The Hague, The Netherlands

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A 38 GHz antenna and transceiver on a rooftop, linking the telecom operator's Rotterdam office with the drop and insert repeater on the telecom tower in Rotterdam.

Photo 33.

Rotterdam, The Netherlands

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Assembling a 75 meter crane before hoisting microwave dishes to the rooftop of a 55 meter apartment building.

Photo 34.

Amstelveen, The Netherlands

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While still in the sling a 2 meter 13 GHz antenna is attached to the supporting structure at an elevation of 55 meters (1999).

Photo 35.

Amstelveen, The Netherlands

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Finalizing the installation of the 2 meter 13 GHz antenna.

Photo 36.

Amstelveen, The Netherlands

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Two of my colleagues adjusting the feeder of a microwave antenna on a 50 meters rooftop in the city of Leiden (The Netherlands) just before the break out of a thunderstorm.

Photo 37.

Leiden, The Netherlands

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Finalizing the installation of a 2 meter 7.5 GHz parabolic antenna on a 50 meters rooftop.

Photo 38.

Haarlem, The Netherlands

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Line-of-sight path survey for a 13.5 km 18 GHz 34+2 Mbit/s microwave link (September 2003).

Photo 39.

Losser, The Netherlands

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Dual-polarized 1.2 metre 18 GHz antenna with 2 integrated 155 Mbit/s SDH transceivers at an height of 150 metres on the telecom tower in Rotterdam (February, 2005)

Photo 40.

Rotterdam, The Netherlands

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Beautiful views to enjoy while working at an height of 150 metres, here the city and port of Rotterdam.

Photo 41.

Rotterdam, The Netherlands

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The view from the Rotterdam telecom tower in southerly direction during a wintry rain shower.

Photo 42.

Rotterdam, The Netherlands

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